Posts Tagged ‘Choose My Plate’

Choose My Plate, Power Plate, and Food Subsidies

An interesting article appeared on the rgj.com blog section. It got some information about the healthy eating, food subsidies, and the contradictions in government policies about the healthy foods.

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) replaced the decades old Food Pyramid with Choose My Plate. The new guidelines are more attractive and easy to understand to anyone. It could be considered as a reminder during the meal times. Choose My Plate is a visual cue that identifies the five basic food groups from which consumers can choose healthy foods to build a healthy plate. The basic groups are vegetables, fruits, grains, protein, and diary. The recommendations are based on the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

Earlier this year, Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM) came out with a new idea called Power Plate to encourage healthy eating. This plan identifies four different food groups: grains, vegetables, fruits, and legumes. PCRM claims that these four food groups provide the good nutrition we need. There is no need for animal-derived products in the diet, and we are better off without them. This is literally a vegan plate.

PCIM disputes some of the recommendations of USDA. The protein portion of the USDA’s MyPlate is unnecessary, because beans, whole grains, and vegetables are loaded with it. And MyPlate reserves a special place for dairy products, which are packed with fat and cholesterol and may increase the risk of health problems ranging from asthma to some types of cancer. There are many more healthful sources of calcium.

The picture on the left shows the percentage of government subsidies to the agriculture industry by food group. The USDA’s My Plate recommends to cut meat and dairy products, but most of the subsidies go into that group. Fruits and vegetables get less than 1% of the subsidies while they are supposed to fill half of the plate. It is worth reading the article appeared on the PCIM website.

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